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20121027
20121104
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out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
district's environment. i am also concerned about the economic health of our city and the seemingly recollectless spending that gets approved annually by the board of supervisors all at the expense of you, the taxpayers. currently we are exceeding $7 billion being passed routinely without an objection from the board. the city civil grand jury reported if rising pension costs are not addressed quickly the city's financial health will be jeopardized and leveraged out to generations to come. if elected i will make sure our future budgets remain balanced without cutting public services or benefits, privatizing our parks and other public resources, replacing additional burdens on the taxpayers. part of my commitment to making san francisco a compassionate city to live in is my proposal to establish animal adoption centers so every homeless pet has a second chance and being found a loving and safe home. for those pets that can't be found good homes, i would propose creating city-run pet sanctuaries so that every pet has a safe place to live, thrive, and be cared for. i also propose making
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
. if you are especially in a marine or water environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and th
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
>> we came to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like l
. it was designed in the 19th century and as a result it's very damaging to the environment. what we do is look at how do we consolidate from 9 reservoirs into 8 and begin to build our local water resources to offset a small percentage of water loss that might happen. let's figure that out. let's not have a conversation based on hypobole, in terms of sean saying there are 7 reports saying it's not feasible, that's not true. what's unfortunate about all those is the city of san francisco has boycotted participating in those studies. san francisco says, wait a minute we have a unique responsibility here. we're the only city that stores our water in a national park so let's see how we can do better because we don't do a very good job. orange county recycles 30 million gallons of water a day, we recycle zero. we have a great opportunity to guarantee our water future and undo the damage to yosemite national park. >> sean, one point i know is the hydroelectric power generated by that dam, if i remember it's 41 million dollars? do i have my numbers right? >> there are a number of reasons why hetc
response at the local level, and then herding all the cats that are in this pretty complex environment and trying to get them moving in a common direction. >> general baldwin? >> first, i'm very, very encouraged at the direction the department of defense has taken in changing the way that we do support the civil authorities. and the evolution, the problem that came out of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
2008 and she has been in congress for jobs and our environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden ga
environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are
to video games. the last point i would like to make is that the environment is really changing rapidly. 10 years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic an
. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most active community. of anyone in this country and any department. he pu
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, t
there are people at risk of foreclosure. this makes a rich environment for people to commit fraud and scams. they are preying on people that have property or equity in the property so they can take the money in the property. they have people desperate in need of relief from mortgages. there's a lot of activity in san francisco. what this enables our office to do is create a specialized unit. to continue to create a specialized unit and build on expertise our office has previously developed. many of you may have heard recently we have had two very noteworthy cases, one was a case involving a 2.2 million fraud scheme where several suspects had filed false deeds in attempt to steal property that was already paid for, no mortgages. and later attempted to go get money loans off the property they had stole on paper. successfully prosecuted and individuals facing upwards of 20 and -- 15 years and up. we've had another scam related to loan modification scams, targeting the hispanic community. where an individual had been promising foreclosure relief and had been taking people's money under the impr
on there. it's a casual environment compared to some of the clubos polk street and having lived in the area i really like the environment of it. i think it's a great use of it, and i think it really does clean up a lot of what is going on down there, and i think he's doing the neighborhood a great service by toning it down because if you ever stepped there on a friday or saturday night it's scary and that's a nice quiet place and it does feel like your living room and i feel he's using it like it's proposed. you can try the wine before you buy a bottle and you don't have to worry about getting run over in the street so i am in favor of it. >> thank you. >> hi there. i am -- [inaudible]. i am a semi new resident of san francisco. let's been almost a year now but since i of living here on moving one of the first places i met a friend after work was at the poor house, and it was intimidating coming into the big city but i found this place it's very comfortable. i felt -- i mean -- i frequent there about twice a month and meet up with girlfriends and me and my friends feel comfortable ther
security and begin to undo the damage that our current water system does to the environment. the plan would then be brought back to the voters in 2016 for their aprafl or disapproval so it's placing the city on a trajectory we're not currently on. we don't recycle any water, we've abandoned most ground water since hetch hetchy became available and we've done real damage to the tuolome river and we begin it's time to get in line with the city's values. it's a plan the voters ultimately get to approve. >> i disagree. i think proposition f is about one thing and one thing only, about forcing the city to spend $8 million dollars to conduct a plan that would require us to drain hetch hetchy reservoir at a cost of anywhere between 3 and 10 billion dollars that gets translated to our rate payers at anywhere between $2,000 and $2700 per year per rate payer. this is a proposal largely hoisted upon san franciscoans by outsiders. not one san francisco organization supports this measure. every group from san francisco tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
demonstrate i can do well in this environment. we get letters from hotel management says, no, no, this person did well, they were perfectly fine. we use that as a way to get people back in permanent housing. but we want to keep the threshold as low as possible to help people who have been on the streets sometimes for years to get into housing. >> (inaudible). >> denise, you had a xwe. >> i will thank you both for being here. i was curious, i want to hear from the client perspective, what kind of feedback do you get from your clients that go through this program? >> i guess we can address it both ways. >> yes, whoever, thank you. >> for the stablization program overwhelmingly it's a positive response. people are happy to have a room that, we ask paepl to save up money but they don't have it pay for the room. there are complaints, there are complaints about bedbugs, there are complaints about people in the space using drugs and alcohol. these are private hotels and we don't have control over every single unit in the hotel. there are people that come into the hotel to sell drugs. this i
approximately 3 to 5 days of solid training to make sure that they are going to be working in a safe environment to learn what's going on. and most of the time that, the incidents in california will become mitigated. now, not to say that we certainly have that as an option. we have a fairly robust what we call fire crew program using cdcr inmate fire fighters. it is on our radar and it's something that we have as a contingency if we needed to do it. >> lieutenant colonel. >> yes, general, in the mou it does address the ground portion but the focus of effort is mainly on the aviation side but it is built in there for the ground side if necessary. >> i just want to say in 2008 we did activate hand crews to fight fires and we've identified soldiers throughout the state to respond if needed. they've got the tools that they need, the boots and all that cached and available. it's really just a matter of getting the call and being ready to go. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot o
king helicopters are used to build awareness of maritime environment. her helicopters are equipped with variable depth tone, radar for surface search and all weather conditions and has capabilities as such. the ch1 alpha aircraft is able to detect submarines and can vary two mark six submarine missiles. thank you, ladies and gentlemen, her majesty's algonquin. >> next in line, is her majesty's canadian ship, edmond. she was one of royal canadian's navy's 12 kingston's classics. built in 1985 as part of the maritime project. he was built with sophisticated warfare equipment. she has proven herself extending far beyond her title. her main elements include 40 millimeter gun, and two, 50 caliber man guns. edmonton is a sophisticated weapon in canada an arsenal. he's has a draft of only 11 feet. she has a displacement of 1,000 tons. edmonton was laid down on 8 august, 1995 by halifax unlimited in halifax, nova scotia and commissioned in the canadian forces on 21 june, 1987 and then asigned to maritime forces pacific based in british columbia. since that time, she has participated in num
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
was someone who was actually crit tal to maintaining her health. but in a work environment, you need to make sure that the rules are clear. so that legislation, tried to create rules in a work environment for some information and they had protection and they could have breaks and they could have all of the protections that we have when we go to work. >> i think this we are a country that is founded on immigrants and i think that actually my ancestors, many people in the audience have been and they came from around the world and across the world. started in new lifes themselves. so, i just support completely the important role that immigrants have and i think that clearly, that there should be a path to citizenship and that there should be a great respect in many ways for all of the things that they do. >> state proposition, 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be expanded and the penalties for the traffickers be increased and be registered for sex offenders and training be provided for law enforcement officers. i am curious, what is your position on this? >> i support that.
and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but we need to do more. let's work with all stakeholders to assure that rules are based on fairn
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 121 (some duplicates have been removed)